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. it was the security council under the charter of the united nations that put that pressure. of course we know that this system worked extremely well. it was 100% performance as a matter of fact. it's not bad for any u.n. organization to get the task and then i think it's probably the only one which succeeded to make it 100% performance. so the -- that means that both destruction capabilities and the monetary capabilities were forcefully placed. so everything looked shiny and fine until the u.s. government -- it was in spring of 1997, through madeline albright made the statement at george mason university, well, it looks like sanctions are -- disarmament is going well. if it goes well we can still not lift the sanctions which was a condition under the security council. sanctions -- so we can't lift the sanctions until saddam hussein is removed. so that came my obsession with the regime change. that, of course, destroyed in the sense the institution and operations. so i think that experience -- could havi annan led the group to see if they can re-establish something similar and this report of w
to the united nations. the un security council is set to meet on the situation in the middle east. this afternoon, israel and moscow agreed to a ceasefire which went into effect at 2:00 eastern this afternoon. looks like the security council meeting may be getting away momentarily and we will take you there live once it does. earlier this afternoon, and jesse jackson, representative from chicago, jesse jackson jr. submitted his resignation to speaker john boehner. nancy pelosi posted a statement saying it is of great sadness that we're learning of this decision. his service in congress is marked by as eloquent advocacy for his constituents abuse and his advocacy. that is from nancy pelosi and her statement on the resignation of jesse jackson jr. today. let's take you live now to the security council meeting at the united nations and the situation in the middle east, the conflict between israel and homospory this is a live look here on c- span. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] ba >> and the 6000 -- a me
from the united nations. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios [ male announcer ] a european-inspired suspension, but it's not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like no other... from a place like nother. introducing the all-w 2013hevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ we are gathered here today to celebrate the union of tim and laura. it's amazing how appreciative ople are when you tell them they could save a lot of money on their car insurance by switching to geico...they may even make you their best man. may i have the rings please? ah, helzberg diamonds. nice choice, mate. ...and now in the presence of these guests we join this loving couple. oh dear... geico. 15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance. . >>> turkey and football and shopping and napping and napping are a thanksgiving weekend traditions, but so is helping, and that's why members of the baptist of the ark
.n., that is the date of the so-called partition of palestine resolution, dating back to 1947 by united nations. that has symbolic meaning as well. and the israelis, not only the israelis have opposed it, but the united states has opposed it. and it will pass most likely because this is a general assembly issue not a security council issue. to but the united states -- -- they are trying to make a point by retaliating in some big way. that will have a cost for the palestinian authority. what does that mean? hamas will emerge as an even bigger winner. there will say, look at what he is getting you have got to vote, but what good did that to do? our way is the best day. get missiles. so that is the political dilemma for the united states. host: leila on our line for independents, go ahead. caller: my comment is, you always have to negotiate with people. when negotiated not only with friends, but with enemies. the enemies have to be [indiscernible] what we initially wanted to do when we sent the president oversees. -- once and for all. guest: hamas is delivering in gazgaza. my own position, just fo
. >>> susan rice, u.s. ambassador to the united nations speaking late today about her comments after the attack on the american consulate in benghazi in september, comments which john mccain would like to turn into the basis of a first giant confrontation between his republican party which he believes he speaks for on foreign policy. and the newly re-elected president obama. joining us bob, great to have you here. happy thanksgiving. >> great to be here, rachel. >> could susan rice be secretary of state if the president wanted her to be? is this sort of john mccain spectacle trying to make an example out of her over now? >> you know, i don't know if it is over. i think he is going to keep on trying. i personally don't think that mccain can block this appointment if the president decides to make it. you know, it is really weird. you watch these clips and you watch all the times that mccain has been wrong and it is almost like slapstick, like this kind of hapless approach to foreign policy. it would be really funny if it wasn't so tragic. because the republicans are not just wrong on f
the united nation's reviews much more than that. i [inaudible] >> before anyone can make an intelligent decision regarding someone involved in benghazi, we need to do a lot more for the state. we don't have the fbi interviews of the survivors one or two days after the attack. we don't have the basic information about what was said tonight at the attack has been shared with congress says that this day. so i remember the episode pretty well. our democratic friends thought like john bolton didn't have the information needed to make an informed decision qualification. john bolton the ambassador and democrats talk in their fields saying we're not going to vote, not going to consider this nomination until they get basic answers to our concerns. .. >> we are now live with condoleezza rice and former chancellor of new york city public schools. they will discuss america's education system and its impact on security. it is part of a event hosted by the excellence in foundation for education. right now we are listening to introductory remarks. >> the first african-american woman to
misleading, but just to be clear, when you have a position where your and ambassador to the united nations, you go well beyond classified talking points in your daily responsibilities, and that is troubling to me as well, i am a person that got -- does not know anything about this and i am going on every single show. is part of our responsibility as an ambassador to the united nations to review much more than that. >> before anybody could make an intelligent decision about someone involved in benghazi, we need to do a lot more. we don't have to see the fbi interviews of the survivors to know that -- will have the basic information about what was said and shared in congress as of this day. i remember the episode very well. it did not have the information to make informed decisions about john bolton the ambassador, and democrats dug in their heels saying we are not going to vote or consider this nomination until we get basic answers to our concerns. all i can tell you is the concerns i had are greater today than they were before. we are not even close to getting the basic answers. >> i have
was the in the united nations where i got educate. i look forward to hearing from you. >> thank you. >> can i say it's been an absolute pressure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach class. [laughter] [applause] >> the ultimate. >> to hear you spike. >> the first time i ever worried about you. >> us a tear i have -- [laughter] but you made the point that idea massive when you are changing things. they matter in national security. one of the reasons that america won the cold war, it recognized it was a moral conflict as much as nick else. an american realized they couldn't win the cold war and the -- [inaudible] in particular if it still had a scandal of segregation. so winning the civil rights a precondition of winning the liberty across the globe. no i think looking from the outside if you'll forgive me, the same danger now. go to china and i criticize them for the lack of democracy. but they say yes, they are educating all of their people. in the middle east and i talked to people there on the edge of radicalism. they say look at the -- [inaudible] justices in your british and european and ame
are barred from challenging any of his decisions. a united nations official expressed serious concern saying this could cause a volatile situation. >>> a woman clowning around near the tomb of the unknowns and a worker that took the picture was fired. she was snapped pointing her middle finger shouting near an arlington national cemetery sign that asked for silence and respect. they took that on a paid trip by their employer. >>> halle berry's ex-boyfriend released on $20,000 bail, after getting into a fight with her current fiance outside her l.a. home thursday. gabriel aubry was hospitalized and later arrested on battery misdemeanor charges. aubry and halle are in a bitter custody dispute. >>> it is back in business this morning. mary thompson joins us from the new york stock exchange. good morning. >> good morning, thomas. markets close early this post holiday session. investors are looking to build on recent games. s and p and nasdaq up the last four sessions. what's on focus? retail stocks, given we had the official kickoff for the shopping season, many yesterday. also investors watch g
of the largest national organization of dreamers, united we dream. they will be planning their next effort, advocating for immigration reform legislation that will bring them and their families out of the shadows once and for all and give them a chance to earn their way to legal status and citizen thp in america. -- citizenship in america. one part of this immigration reform, the dream act is near and dear to me but i want to see comprehensive immigration reform before it is over. we know if we pass the dream act, it will help the economy, creating new jobs and economic growth when the talent of these young people, as they come out of high school and college is brought in our economy. in my home state of illinois, by 2030 the dream act will contribute $14 billion in economic activity, and dreamers would create up to 58,992 new jobs. i come to the floor to tell their stories. they used to hide in the shadows. they didn't want to talk about who they were because they were undocumented and afraid to be deported. many were deported. but i came to the floor to tell the stories of those who had
. margaret anderson was living her dream, working with her husband at mount rainier national park as a united states park ranger. her duties were not confined to patrolling, but ranged from supervision of snowplow areas to medical coordination and instruction for her fellow staff members. anderson was described by her colleagues as a candid and honest co-worker who could always bring a smile to your face. on new year's day, anderson blocked the road with her patrol car to hinder the escape of a man who crashed through a checkpoint. little did she know at that time that the man was a suspect in an earlier shooting that wounded four people. the suspect shot at her while she was still blocking the road with her patrol car and she was fatally wounded. mr. speaker, national park ranger margaret anderson made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty. i urge passage of this bill to honor her on behalf of all of our colleagues in the house, especially the washington dedication. and this -- passage of this bill is dedicated to her family and to the united states park service. i urge passage of h.r.
, with the wrong skin color? the beauty of our constitution is that it gives everyone in the united states basic due process rights to a trial by a jury of their peers. that is what makes this nation great. as justice sandra day o'connor wrote for the plurality in hamdi v. rumsfeld, and i vote -- "as critical as the government's interest may be in detaining those who actually pose an immediate threat to the national security of the united states during ongoing international conflict, history and common sense teach us that an unchecked system of detention carries the potential to become a means for oppression and abuse of others who do not present that sort of threat." i mean, just think of it. if you were of the wrong race and you were in a place where there was an attack, you were picked up, you could be held without charge or trial month after month, year after year, that's wrong. experiences over the last decade prove the country is safer now than before the 9/11 attacks. terrorists are behind bars. dangerous plots have been thwarted. the system is working, and hopefully improving each day. s
but the united states of america is held together by a great national creed not by ethnicity or blood or religion, our national creed is an aspiration will narrative that it doesn't matter where you came from. it matters where you are going. you can come from homeless circumstances and do great things and the only way that is true is if you have access to a high-quality education and if it ever becomes the case as it is increasingly now, as i said many times i can look at your zip code and the social fabric of this country has no chance to hold together and we will be picked one against the other and those who are capable and those who are not. those who are employable and those who are not. i can assure you that you might not be able to control your circumstances but you can control your response to your circumstances. that will no longer be the way americans think about themselves or each other and that gives way to entitlements. at core, the real problem for us in national security is not just our competitiveness abroad, the great national narrative, this cohesion that has made us the country
are fighting against a national clean energy policy in the united states, guess what. china has a very, very focused and intense strategy. for example china's finance ministry announced it would set aside up to $321 million each year for clean energy electric vehicle research and development. just for those kind of cars. just for research and development. now, they're doing a heck of a lot more. for a closer look at what american electric car policies should be, we're bringing on lisa, the author of the book "oil on the brain," petroleum's long, strange trip to your tank. she comes us to from new york where she's a senior research fellow at the new america foundation. lisa, thank you so much for joining us inside "the war room." >> thank you. >> jennifer: all right. so let me get right to it because you're the expert. what is the most important public policy that america should adopt to promote electriification of vehicles? >> i think there's two things. one thing we should do is really make the cars available to p
review and smaller units and not have such a large interlinked bread where they are transmitted thousands of miles. host: profits are up, why does the private sector expect taxpayers to foot the bill -- she writes -- nationalize it. guest: the reality is that we do not need taxpayers to modernize the grid, the electricity industry has become the lowest of all industries in terms of reinvesting for research and development and new infrastructure on an annualized basis. i do not know if anyone heard the advertisement that the railroad industry is running. they said we were going to spend $23 million in reinvesting the freight railroad for the future. i started thinking about that. the freight railroad industry is much smaller than the electricity industry. utilities spend about $10 billion in reinvestment. we need a regulatory initiative to allow the utilities to recover the investments that they make in bonafide, long-term investments to the grid. yes, they will have to pay, but i think of what we've discovered with hurricane sandy is that consumers and taxpayers are going to pay through t
to invest in our nation's infrastructure can cause the united states $129 billion a year and over the next 10 years. u.s. businesses would pay $430 billion in transportation costs, household incomes will fall by 7000, and exports will fall by $28 billion. meanwhile, we are falling behind in the global economy. china invests 9% in gross domestic product and infrastructure. here in america, we spend less than 2% of gdp on infrastructure. it is constant bipartisan support that can help close these gaps, restored bridges and water systems. we can do something about telecommunications across this nation, allowing us to build a twenty first century infrastructure. it can work to create jobs all across america. well paying jobs that can't be outsourced. we are once again making things in america, and this is a great nation that has been built on bricks and mortar and fiber optics. we have got to get back to doing that again. we do not have the time or the luxury to play little games. we did pass job legislation right now including an infrastructure by, when that will create jobs, spur investment,
on immigration. here we go. michael graham. >> if you want a communist united states and work and make our nation better while making yourself better, come on! we've got legal immigration as marco said. if you're coming here because i want to live in america everything is free in america there's no country in the world says hey, send us your deadbeats so we can put them on the deadbeat dole as soon as they arrive. it is a crazy message. it is a slap in the face to the millions and millions of legal immigrants who come here, work and then their tax dollars go to pay bums to live off of our system. >> stephanie: at least he has a soothing tone of voice. >> how come everybody is so yelly today? >> stephanie: i don't know. >> because romney lost black guy in the white house! [ ♪ "jeopardy" theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: who said pakistanis fight against indians. greeks and turks and palestinians. different cultures fight over ethnic and geographic grudges from the past. here in america, they come together to build a future
used increasingly by law enforcement officials in the united states. host: mike lyons is a national security analyst. he served in the army and finished his career as executive officer to the deputy chief of staff for operations in the netherlands >>. leah is the next caller. caller: week received a grant money so the police could learn to do surveillance. they are coming into the neighborhoods. they are bringing the drones close to the roof levels banging the roofs causing sleep deprivation. there is no oversight. homeland security never set the committee a up. there is also a problem with health. when you use electromagnetic close to a person, it changes the charge of the cells that causes disease. host: what about the possible health impacts? guest: if you listened to any of the cable networks during the fighting in gaza over the past weeks, you heard that the sound of the unmanned vehicles. it is designed to be used positively to look at traffic patterns. it is designed to be used in ways to help the community. in fact, the crash. they create noise. those things are not consider
of the united states because we have a $60 trillion debt, you can stay as strong and independent nation if you continue to have that kind of debt to another nation, specifically the amount of money we are borrowing from china, we have to get our financial house in order and i think elections are over, people ought to put away the talking points in time for the president to actually lead, offer proposals that come up with a real solution that addresses the long-term problems that we're facing with medicare, social security, those are the two tidal waves coming at us when he says do the arithmetic, that is where the big numbers are, tracy. tracy: agreed. somebody has to give somewhere. where are you willing to give a little as far as tax reform goes because we're not going to see a new internal revenue code before the end of the year. we have to work with what we have. where can you budget little? >> we had a couple of dry runs the last couple of years. it is time for people to come together and do the major solving of the problem, which is deal with entitlements, deal with medicare and look at
to bring that forward. the diplomatic industrial and economic pieces of strategy of united states and for other countries are parts that are used to put forth those pieces that are best for those nations. however, there are some governments that do not and will not adhere to those things in the interest of the united states. if that is the case, we have to have places where we can bring troops into at a moment's notice or in a short period of time and ordered to be able to, when necessary, put forth military pace. host: you would be against the drawing down some of these bases around the world? caller: i agree that some of them are unnecessary. the military has taken that into account but i am listening to the ones she is talking about and i think that is not exactly the majority. host: which ones in particular are you concerned about with regard to countries? caller: places like japan. the base in germany, i could probably agree with that. in japan, you have a force of their in north korea. north korea is not a force that people should take lightly. guest: thank you, i think ther
the united states space program. representative hall has been an especially strong voice for our nation's human space flight program which has benefited not only tbs and florida but propoled our nation on the path of unprecedented scientific and technological advancement. we can all learn a lot from our colleagues. congressman hall leads by example. he's well known for calling a spade a spade. his word truly is his bond and you can always take that to the bank. advancing our nation's human space flight program has been a hallmark for chairman hall. as we look out at america's next general riggs of explorers, space is their destiny and he'll help ensure that they reach it. ralph, there's a lot of work to do and i'm truly honored by the opportunity to serve with you an get it done. i only hope and pray when i'm 65 years old that bill in half as good shape or half as active as you. mr. smith: i yield to minutes to the gentleman from texas, quico canseco. mr. canseco: i thank my friend and colleague for yielding to me. i rise to honor a great man, a great texan, and a great american, ralph
pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, november 27, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable christopher a. coons, a senator from the state of delaware, to perform the duties of the chai. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: i now move to proceed to calendar number 419, s. 3254, the defense authorization bill. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 419, s. 3254, a bill to authorize aeption prosecutes for fiscal year 2013 for military activities in the department of defense and so forth and for other purposes. mr. reid: we're going to recess, as we normally do on tuesdays, from 12:30 to 2:15 to allow for our weekly caucu
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)